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Health

Exclusive: J&J warns of 'hackable' insulin pump

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Health

Exclusive: J&J warns of 'hackable' insulin pump

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COMING UP:Exclusive: J&J warns of 'hackable' insulin pump

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> Diabetes Institute->> Johnson & Johnson this week warning of a cybersecurity bug in one of its insulin pumps which a hacker could exploit to deliver a fatal overdose to patients. Reuters' cybersecurity correspondent Jim Finkle was first to report on the vulnerability.>> I've been covering cybersecurity and medical device security for at least five years.
00:00:22
And this is really unprecedented for a major manufacturer of a medical device that is in use to come out and say that the devices are vulnerable to cyber attacks and to provide guidance for patients to protect themselves. We're really entering a new era here. I want twenty units of insulin.
00:00:41
>> Johnson and Johnson executives telling Reuters they know of no examples have attempted attacks on its MMS One Touch ping insulin pump. But nonetheless the company is sending letters to all of its customers who use the device.>> As far as we can tell, this only affects about 114,000 patients in the US and Canada who use this model of pump from J&J Animas.
00:01:03
Now, J&J said there's an extremely low, with quotes around it, possibility that this would happen. But because it's possible they're providing information to patients about ways to prevent hackers from doing that.>> The warning follows revelations last month about potentially life threatening cyber vulnerabilities in pacemakers and defibrillators from St. Jude Medical.
00:01:25
St. Jude said the claims were false, its shares still sank. Johnson and Johnson's letter to customers said that if they were concerned, they could take steps to stop potential attacks, including programming the pump to limit the maximum insulin dose.>> Through menu.