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World

Tory conference wrestles with May's Brexit vision

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Opening sequence

World

Tory conference wrestles with May's Brexit vision

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COMING UP:Tory conference wrestles with May's Brexit vision

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00:00:00
>> Theresa May is still window shopping for her full Brexit itinerary. We know a date, March 2017. That's when the UK plans to officially set in motion its EU departure. For those filing in and out of this hall, Theresa May has set out a Brexit policy of sorts, which has managed to keep some of the criticism at bay.
00:00:21
But for how long? I'm Reuters reporter Jacob Greaves at the Conservative annual party conference in Birmingham, where there's still plenty to disagree on when it comes to how to leave the EU. The leave camp likes what they've heard so far. The perceived wisdom from May's Sunday opening speech, a hard Brexit may be on the cards without single market access.
00:00:42
That sent Sterling into a tailspin, plunging to a 31 year low, and worried some remain Conservative MPs.>> The Prime Minister's got a very difficult job. She's got to deliver Brexit, she's made it clear she will do that and undoubtedly she will. But the realities are beginning to dawn.
00:00:59
And I think there is a danger that she will be pushed by some into just leaping into that unknown, almost as soon as possible.>> The devil will be in the detail. At the moment, we have very little of it. But once the spectacle of conference is over, another key point to argue over will be whether any of this needs Parliamentary approval.
00:01:20
>> All previous major treaty changes do not get triggered without Parliamentary approval. And in my view the government would be very well advised to get Parliamentary approval, which is actually from the House of Commons, before they trigger Article 50. And I don't see that there's a valid argument that in some way, because there's been a referendum, that isn't necessary.
00:01:41
>> On Tuesday, May warned there will be bumps in the road to Brexit. But from negotiating stance right down to implementation, we still have very little idea what type of exit she's bought into.