FIRST AIRED: August 5, 2016

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> Nice to meet you.>> Retirees brushing up on their English, courtesy of the government. A small part of China's sweeping preparations for its first G20 Summit in Hangzhou, just outside Shanghai.>>
FOREIGN]
> I heard only 2,000 cars are gonna be able to enter the city, that's ridiculous. They're hosting a summit, my taxi won't affect them.>> Authorities have declared a week-long holiday to encourage people to leave town. They're also taking new steps like banning drone and model airplane flights.
00:00:21
We want to show off our city and China to the entire world.>> Leaders from the 20 biggest economies will be arriving the next few weeks, including US President Barrack Obama. And China is determined to impress them with a world-class city. I'm Anita Lee in Shanghai, where a lower level G20 meeting took place earlier this year.
00:00:42
Nothing too out of the ordinary back then and when I arrived at the Shangri-La Hotel, I walked right in past x-ray security. But as Hangzhou prepares to welcome world leaders this month, it's a very different story. Police are bringing way more rules, like banning leases on apartments and blocking hotel bookings for anyone not taking part in the summit.
00:01:05
They're also giving out $1.5 billion in free travel tickets to clear people out of town. Language lessons and freebies aside, not everyone is happy in this city of 9 million people, especially when it comes to the hundreds of construction projects underway across the city all related to the G20.
00:01:24
>>
00:01:42
And of course, in trademark Chinese style, hundreds of local factories are being shut down to ensure that the world's most powerful leaders see nothing but blue skies over Hangzhou.