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World

Indonesia's new generation of jihadis

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Opening sequence

World

Indonesia's new generation of jihadis

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COMING UP:Indonesia's new generation of jihadis

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00:00:02
>> Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim country, so far it's avoided the kind of Islamic State attacks that have rocked Europe but maybe not for long. This is the city of Solo which authorities warn is prime recruiting ground for militants, thanks to the growing influence of ISIS and modern technology.
00:00:19
Reuters Kanupriya Kapoor visited the city on the island of Java to learn more.>> Authorities are saying that this recent wave of radicalism here in Solo is attributable mostly to the widespread access to the internet. More and more people are online. More and more people have smartphones and are free to share radical content online.
00:00:41
>> One man who's taken advantage of that is Bahrun Naim who used to run an internet cafe in Solo. Police now call him the country's most wanted militant and say he masterminded the deadly attacks at Jakarta earlier this year. Today, he's pulling the strings far from home.>> Bahrun Naim is an Indonesian, a radical fighting with Islamic State in Syria.
00:01:03
He is able to remotely activate small groups of people, small cells here and urge them to carry out small scale attacks here in Indonesia against the police or against foreign targets.>> Solo has a history of schools and mosques with ties to radical Islam. Some of the militants behind the deadly 2002 Bali bombings were from here.
00:01:24
After a massive crackdown on radicalism, things quieted down, until the rise of Naim and his militants, funded from abroad and trained on the internet. Security officials say so far the work of Indonesia's fledgling militants is amateurish. But it's only a matter of time before they've got the materials and the know how to launch a major attack.