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Business

Protests greet policymakers at Fed meeting

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Opening sequence

Business

Protests greet policymakers at Fed meeting

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COMING UP:Protests greet policymakers at Fed meeting

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Transcript

00:00:02
>> Fed Up, a network of community organizers and labor unions is making noise for change, at perhaps, the most important annual meeting of central bankers in the world. Protestor's have been here before calling for more to be done about income inequality, transparency, and diversity. As Federal Reserve Honchos talk monetary policy, Reuters correspondent Anne Sephir is in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.
00:00:27
>> Protestors have been coming for about three years straight. This year it's different, they're actually meeting with about eight policy makers to give voice to their concerns here.>> Concerns the protest could get big even prompted organizers to change the formal dress code for Thursday evening to casual.
00:00:44
>> Kansas City fed President Esther George sent a letter out to everybody actually telling them that they don't need to dress up for dinner tonight. So that they possibly could blend in more as we have this kind of activism going on outside. We're seeing Fed Presidents walking around in t-shirts, John Williams out of San Francisco, Fed has an Elvis Costello t-shirt on, so it's very different from years past.
00:01:09
>> Fed Up isn't out on a limb alone, it's got some powerful allies, even some in congress, forcing issues of racial, gender, and income inequality onto the Fed's agenda. Currently 11 of 12 regional Fed presidents are white, and 10 are male, none are black or Latino. And Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, has also come out in favor or restricting the financial world's influence on the regional Fed boards.