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Sports

China's muscular move into extreme sport

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Opening sequence

Sports

China's muscular move into extreme sport

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COMING UP:China's muscular move into extreme sport

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Transcript

00:00:02
>> A fitness phenomenon being hauled into Asia. Across China, athletes are pumping and sweating their way to mega fitness spurred by rising incomes and the globalization of hardcore sport.>> I'm Reuters Tara Joseph at Pure Fitness in Hong Kong where athletes train in everything from kickboxing to gymnastics.
00:00:20
Market researchers say the China fitness industry is set to generate six billion dollars in revenue this year alone. That's up 12% from 2015. One of the most famous faces of this global trend, legendary muscle man Arnold Schwarzenegger. He's been hosting a body building and fitness expo in Hong Kong and sees Asia as a bulging opportunity.
00:00:44
>> When you talk about the world, that you have it all over the world, you naturally talk about all six continents, right? And Asia was one of the most important ones, actually the most difficult to find really the right spot. Because there were a lot of countries bidding and offering a lot of money.
00:01:00
I mean we're talking about 4.4 billion people in Asia, so if you really want to promote health and fitness you would waste your time if you did not include Asia.>> Fitness in Asia used to be associated with sports like table tennis and martial arts. But people are now getting inspired by whats happening overseas.
00:01:18
>> Western sportswear is flying off the shelves. And popular apps like Gotokeep have millions of users hooked on bodybuilding. Even the Chinese government has a fitness plan, counting on sport to help drive the national economy. Just last year, China's richest man, Wong Jan Lin, bought the organizer of Ironman triathlon races for $650 million, laying the tracks for more sweat and glory in the world's most populous country.