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World

Dozens of Zika cases discovered in Singapore

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Opening sequence

World

Dozens of Zika cases discovered in Singapore

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COMING UP:Dozens of Zika cases discovered in Singapore

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00:00:02
>> More than 40 confirmed cases of Zika and counting. That's the latest tally in Singapore on Monday, just two days after the city-state confirmed its first locally transmitted case of the virus. Most of those infected are foreign construction workers. The health ministry saying the majority have recovered, though a handful are still in hospital.
00:00:20
Reuters Marius Zaharia says it's clear that this outbreak wasn't brought in from outside.>> Basically, on Sunday they discovered the Zika virus in more than 30 foreign workers here in Singapore. And they're very low paid people in this country. And they rarely catch a break so, for sure they haven't traveled anywhere.
00:00:44
>> A Malaysian woman became Singapore's first locally transmitted Zika patient over the weekend. Around 200 workers have been deployed to clean drains and spray insecticide. There's concerned fear over the virus could affect tourism, including the upcoming F1 Grand Prix. Nearly every country in Southeast Asia has recorded Zika cases since 2013.
00:01:03
>> But now many of them are prepared to fight mosquitoes like Singapore.>> I think the concern is that in Singapore we know of these cases and we know that the numbers escalated so quickly, but Singapore has a decade experience of fighting dengue. It's a good question of whether many of the Zika cases in villages and in Thailand or Indonesia or the Philippines, have even been detected.
00:01:33
>> The current string sweeping Latin America actually began in Asia and experts say people there may have built up greater immunity. But officials say they can't rule out further instances of Zika. In fact, they expect more cases to be identified.