FIRST AIRED: March 8, 2017

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00:00:00
>> That your company is leaving.>> In public and on Twitter, President Trump is often a merciless critic of corporate executives, but in the Oval Office when the camera stop he turns on the charm. Nearly a dozen top executives who have met with Trump at a flurry of White House meetings telling Reuters the President is a much different person in private.
00:00:19
More of a listener in chief eager to build connections. Reuters David Shepardson reported the story.>> The President has been very eager to show another side with the He's been charming, he's basically tried to convince them through a soft cell to do more, add more jobs and he did a lot of things to engage.
00:00:39
And his real focus in these meetings is, what can I do to help you to add more jobs?>> All that in sharp contrast to his many tweets taking on the business elite. Slamming everyone from defense contractors and drug makers for runaway prices, to automakers for setting up in Mexico.
00:00:56
>> The regulatory burden.>> But in person, CEOs say the conversations have been more about easing regulations than browbeating them about jobs. And at the end of most meetings, Trump leading visitors on a tour of the Oval Office, showing off the rugs and curtains. Trump's style familiar to those who worked with him at his own company.
00:01:14
Two former employees say he typically began meetings bragging about his own accomplishments. Then praising visitors and asking for input from everyone in the room.>> You know, having a good relationship with the president, you know, these auto companies really have a lot of other issues like fuel economy, regulation and so on and so.
00:01:31
They clearly have incentives to try to work with the administration wherever they can.>> Still unknown whether Trump's instincts for back slapping CEOs will translate into jobs flowing back into the US as he promised.