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00:00:01
>> More people fled their homes here in the first half of this year, than anywhere else in the world. But this isn't Syria, Iraq or Yemen, this is the Democratic Republic of Congo. Violence and political unrest have plunged the African nation into what is being called a mega crisis.
00:00:18
The Internal Displacement Monitoring Center says more than 1.7 million people have been displaced this year, people like Antoinette Mabuyu who ran from her village amid the sound of gunshots.>>
FOREIGN]
> I didn't know where my husband and children had gone. Three days later I found ten of my children.
00:00:37
I still don't know where one of my children and my husband are.>> They're running from violence like this. This unverified video which emerged in February, purports to show Congli soldiers shooting men and women in an operation against the Camuwina in Sapu militia. After it's release, the UN said there are multiple credible allogations of massive human rights violations in the DRC.
00:01:02
Congo was plunged into political uncertainty after president Joseph Kabila was forced to step down after the end of second elected term a year ago. The battle against Cameroon on Sapu has recently spread from Kasa region to other parts of the country. That's putting millions of people at risk of starvation and disease, but little international aid has arrived.
00:01:23
>> This is one of the most underfunded humanitarian crisis, down there this has protection consequences people are dying and people are getting sick. They are malnourished.>> Up to 7.7 million people are severely food insecure, the Norwegian Refugee Council says. And a lack of access to clean drinking water has led to a cholera outbreak.
00:01:44
Millions of people died in conflicts in the DRC between 1996 and 2003, mainly due to hunger and starvation. Analysts fear history may be about to repeat itself.