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Politics

Trump courts minority vote in Detroit

Opening sequence

Opening sequence

Politics

Trump courts minority vote in Detroit

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COMING UP:Trump courts minority vote in Detroit

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> African-American community.>> Donald Trump heading to a predominantly African American church in Detroit Saturday, in an effort to boost his dismal poll numbers among minorities. Reuters' campaign correspondent Ginger Gibson says the campaign has a lot of catching up to do.>> So far, Trump has made most of his appeals to African American voters in rally speeches.
00:00:19
A lot of these conversations have happened in rallies that are predominately attended by white voters and not African American voters. He came under a lot of criticism for telling minority voters that they were living in war zones, and in poverty, and in fear, and that voting for him was a matter of what do you have to lose.
00:00:36
>> What the hell do you have to lose?>> Trump's consistently seeing his support among African Americans in the single digits. At times dipping down to just 1 or 2%. But his outreach to minorities might not really be aimed at them.>> Academics and political science experts tell me that a part of what that is is him trying to reach out to those white voters who are moderates, undecided, and are hearing Hillary Clinton or their friends describe Donald Trump as a racist.
00:01:05
By saying to those voters, I'm going to help minorities, I'm helping African Americans, I'm interested in African American voters, he's trying to assure those white moderate voters that he's not a racist.>> His Detroit trip already off to an embarrassing start, as the New York Times revealed that both the questions and answers with the pastor of the church had been scripted.