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World

Hollande calls for more resources to fight terror

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World

Hollande calls for more resources to fight terror

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COMING UP:Hollande calls for more resources to fight terror

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00:00:00
>>
MUSIC]
00:00:02
In memory of the hundreds of French nationals who have lost their lives to terrorism, President François Hollande, side by side with fellow politicians and campaign rivals, paying homage to the victims of attacks on French soil. 230 people killed in less than two years. It's a dark cloud over the country and over President Hollande's government.
00:00:24
>> Today, I call on you directly, Mr. President, but also those who will succeed you, in the name of my own generation and the one to come, to put a permanent stop to these inhumane acts, difficult though that may seem.>> France has been under emergency law since the attacks in Paris last year.
00:00:42
The government has put thousands of extra police and soldiers on the streets, but Hollande admits more needs to be done, and says anti-terror measures should always take precedent over spending cuts.>>
FOREIGN]
> That's why the action that is already being taken must be sustained. I am talking about all the measures taken to foresee a tax, deter them and stop them.
00:01:06
It's a constant battle, and we'll need still more resources than those I've called for.>> France is gearing up for a presidential election next year. Hollande has yet to confirm if he'll run, but polls aren't on his side. In fact, they suggest he's one of France's least popular presidents of modern times.
00:01:25
French newspaper Le Figaro, saying the leader would just get 11% support if the ballot was held now. If he does go for reelection, he's likely to face one of two former presidents, either Nicolas Sarkozy or Alain Juppe, for the Republicans. And Marine Le Pen, whose far right National Front Party is expected to make it to the second round of the two stage election, campaigning for national sovereignty and tighter immigration control.