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World

Feminist party takes on UK fashion industry

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Opening sequence

World

Feminist party takes on UK fashion industry

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COMING UP:Feminist party takes on UK fashion industry

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00:00:01
>> As London Fashion Week opens on Friday, a feminist party is putting the industry under the lens.>> I'm Reuters' reporter Lucy Fielder, here at the East London studio where they're shooting the No Size Fits All campaign. The aim is to pressure the fashion industry to stop using tiny sample sizes that women have to literally starve themselves to get into.
00:00:23
>> The Women's Equality Party wants the British Fashion Council to make designers show two sample sizes, one of them a UK 12. That's a US 10, or above. And use models with a body mass index of at least 18.5, or a doctor's approval.>> There is a huge public health problem here.
00:00:42
1.6 million people in Britain are suffering from eating disorders. So our campaign is about moving away from the softly, softly approach and to say, it is time to call the fashion industry to account.>> Pop star turned designer, Victoria Beckham, has come under fire for hiring ultra thin models for this year's New York Fashion Week.
00:01:03
To help girls cope with a constant diet of such images, Women's Equality wants body image to be taught at school and for fashion magazines to feature some larger models in each issue. Social media activist Jada Sezer won a contract with the top agency by recreating the kind of fashion spreads that usually feature thinner women and posting them online.
00:01:24
>> I went on to work with only plus size brands, which I felt was almost a glass ceiling. I couldn't quite get my head around why I couldn't work with other brands,. Because I knew that these girls that were following me and following my blog, they wanted to wear the clothes that other designers were creating, or even high street brands were creating.
00:01:45
>> The Fashion Council has agreed to meet the activists, who are hopeful the industry could shape up by next year's London Fashion Week.