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World

Brexit storm rocks aerospace show

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World

Brexit storm rocks aerospace show

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00:00:01
>> Downpour. The aerospace industry's biggest event of the year, evacuated on its opening day. That after a rainstorm cut power to the Farnborough Airshow site just outside London. Awkward symbolism just hours after David Cameron swung by to persuade the industry's biggest players not to be driven away by Brexit, the outgoing UK Prime Minister trying hard to sound positive.
00:00:23
>> We must recognize we are in a new reality now. We must accept it, we must make it work.>> But the industry is worried. Airliner orders already down on past years. Now plane makers fear a new hit from Brexit.>> In Farnborough, I'm Reuter's report, Julian Satterthwaite.
00:00:37
It's no surprise to find David Cameron here behind me, because this industry is a big deal for the UK. It employs about 340,000 people here and any move to leave by companies like Airbus and Boeing would be devastating for manufacturing. Before the vote, Airbus was openly against Brexit.
00:00:57
Now it says it is reviewing its UK investment plans. US giant, Boeing, was carefully neutral, but it too is keeping a weary watch for any fallout.>> When we take a look at Brexit, clearly it's caused a lot of turmoil in the marketplace. What we're watching is what will it do in terms of impact of the long-term economic growth here in the UK, the long term economic growth in Europe.
00:01:21
>>
APPLAUSE
>> Cameron hopes defense might be a trump card. On Monday, he signed big orders for Boeing military jets and helicopters, deals that will create about 2,000 new jobs in the UK. Cameron says that's proof that the country is still open for business, but Britain's notorious summer weather doesn't seem to be on message.