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World

Bangladesh says I.S. not responsible for attack

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World

Bangladesh says I.S. not responsible for attack

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COMING UP:Bangladesh says I.S. not responsible for attack

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Transcript

00:00:00
>>
NOISE].
he Bangladesh government disputing claims that Islamic state or Al Qaeda were involved in this weekend's attack at a restaurant in Dhaka. The country's home minister telling Reuters that seven militants were homegrown members of the domestic extremist group, Jamaat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh or JMB. Officials saying they were mostly educated and from rich families, and that authorities had tried to arrest five of them in the past.
00:00:23
>> Is a slogan, there is no existence of IS. These homegrown terrorists want to contact with the IS, this is the main thing. But all are our homegrown, our nationals. It is not from other countries. It is all our nationals, our people.>> The gunmen stormed the upscale cafe popular with expatriates late Friday night.
00:00:48
After 12 hour standoff, police killed 6 of the attackers and captured 7, but not before the militants slaughtered 20 hostages, including 9 Italians, 7 Japanese, and 1 US citizen. Islamic State claimed responsibility for the siege, releasing pictures of five fighters, it says, were involved. But Bangladesh authorities, who have in the past denied the group has a foothold in the country, say they are still investigating whether the attackers received guidance from foreign extremists.
00:01:16
The country has blamed JMB and another homegrown organization for a wave of grisly violence over the past 18 months. A spate of murders claimed by IS and Al-Qaeda have targeted liberals, gays, foreigners, and religious minorities