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Oddly Enough

Kellogg's debuts its all-day cereal cafe

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Opening sequence

Oddly Enough

Kellogg's debuts its all-day cereal cafe

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COMING UP:Kellogg's debuts its all-day cereal cafe

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Transcript

00:00:01
>> Your bowl of Frosted Flakes is getting a facelift. Kellogg's is moving off of the grocery store shelf and opening the doors to its first ever restaurant. The store is an all-day cereal cafe located in the heart of Times Square. It's an attempt to rebrand the humble bowl of cereal and bring it into upscale dining.
00:00:19
But that does come with the upscale price of $7.50 a bowl. So how does Kellogg's rationalize the price? You can order bowls created by Momofuku Milk Bar's Christina Tosi, or you can raid the pantry to create your own bowl.>> Okay, let's see here. We're gonna try the strawberry.
00:00:36
>> I tried the lemon and pistachio, and then created a bowl with mint, strawberries, pistachios, and green tea powder. Anthony Rudolf, the brains behind the new cafe, formerly ran upscale restaurants, Per Se and Bouchon Bakery.>> Cereal is very familiar. Right, it's been around for 110 years. We all have some emotional connectedness to our childhood and a bowl of cereal.
00:00:57
But what's unfamiliar is purchasing it outside of the home. I think one of the biggest points of the barrier to overcome for people psychologically is gonna be the price.>> Rudolf says a restaurant devoted to cereal is just a new concept, one he believes will catch.>> It's the same thing 20 years ago when people said, I'll never spend $5 for a cup of coffee at Starbucks, right?
00:01:21
I mean, that was the thing because you could buy a can of coffee for the same you could for a cup of coffee. But I think we go out as people, not just because we can do it more cheaply at home, but it's because we wanna be a part of something or experience something new or try something that maybe we can then bring back and increase the quality of what we do at home.
00:01:44
>> The experience economy is on the upswing, but growing health concerns over sugar-laden cereals are leaving US cereal sales a little soggy. Kellogg's will try to change that one whimsical bowl of cereal at a time.