FIRST AIRED: June 27, 2016

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00:00:00
>> A kingdom disunited, Britain's vote to leave the EU has exposed a rift in the UK. Scotland and Northern Ireland wanting in, as England and Wales voted out. The creep, if you're a skepticism, even entering the UK's metropolitan fringe. This area voted almost the exact opposite way to the rest of London.
00:00:22
I'm Reuters reporter Jacob Greaves in Romford, part of Havering, where a whopping 69.7% of people said they want out of the EU. The east London working-class neighborhood, a former Labour stomping ground turned a UKIP stronghold, the reasons for voting out ranging from immigration to sovereignty.>> Stop the immigrants coming in.
00:00:42
They're taking over, takings all our jobs, taking our homes.>> I think we're paying too much money in the EU and they're telling us what we can and we can't do.>> But half those views changed from Brexit to Regrexit as Britain's economy reels from the vote out.
00:01:00
>> They all gotta get together, and try and work something out. And if they don't do that, I don't know where we'll end up in a couple years time, know what I mean?>> Concern, maybe, but nothing we heard suggests regret, even among local businesses.>> It'll sort itself out, I'm sure it will.
00:01:17
If it doesn't, we'll have no choice now anyway so, we'll see what happens.>> The some 48% of the national vote that wanted to stay may see Britain's future differently. But the immediate post-mortem suggests this was an argument won on emotion, not economics. Regrets, if they do set in, may not be dictated by Britain's purse strings.