FIRST AIRED: July 12, 2019

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00:00:00
they may look pretty but these lionfish are predatory and venomous under wrecking havoc off the coast of Lebanon fishermen how son Eunice's been diving this same waltzes office coastal hometown this three decades is never seen anything like this native species are disappearing and invasive lionfish on taking that place , many times and it's not just me many fishermen of the same we go out to see me come back empty handed because there are a few fish there are however plenty of line fish native to the Red Sea and the Indo Pacific region they are pretty good he sang that is a like a global this fish is like a genocide it settles intakes of the place of everything he does not co exist along with of the fish they mainly live weather see past us so see best numbers of radically decreased page everything they even eat each other if they can't find anything to eat , expense say they've spread for a number of reasons the expansion of the Suez Canal which connects the Red Sea and the Mediterranean is one and warming waters as a result of climate change and now the they are threatening coral reefs and fish stocks Lebanese waters already weakened by overfishing and pollution but that may be a solution , eating them environmentalists in Lebanon say the livelihood of the fishermen and the survival of the marine ecosystem may depend on its , low in her early for us it's also one of the tastiest types of fish today in the seat we're encouraging the fishermen and people to ask for it in restaurants on the fish market