FIRST AIRED: November 14, 2017

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

×

Transcript

00:00:00
>>
MUSIC]
00:00:01
They are the soldiers accused of atrocities like these.>>
FOREIGN]
> Three soldiers entered my house and raped me.>> But on Monday, Myanmar's army released a report denying all allegations of rape and killing of Rohingya Muslims by security forces.
00:00:22
Though how it reached that conclusion is unclear. As Reuters Antoni Slodkowski explains.>> It's all murky and I don't think people who do these kind of investigations on international stage would agree that it was done in any sort of a transparent manner. It's the military who are being accused here, and then for them to investigate their own alleged misconduct is highly questionable.
00:00:49
>> More than 600 thousand Rohingya have now fled to neighboring Bangladesh and in the past few days a senior UN official visiting refugee camps has accused Myanmar soldiers of carrying out crimes against humanity. But according to Monday's report, the army's own internal investigation has cleared security forces of all accusations of atrocities including killing villages, raping women or setting fire to Rohingya mosques though the refugees tell a different story.
00:01:21
>> Many of them corroborate each other, many of them are very precise, many of them are quite detailed. And they point to the military and the Rakhine mobs as the main perpetrators of this violence. So while it's very difficult to disprove the military's claims because of the lack of access, it's possible to say that there was an overwhelming body of first-hand testimonies that suggest that it is the military that committed these crimes.
00:01:56
>> It comes ahead of a visit by US Secretary of State Rex Tilson, Wednesday, when he's expected to deliver a stern message to Myanmar's military.