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World

Confusion over blast onboard EgyptAir flight

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World

Confusion over blast onboard EgyptAir flight

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COMING UP:Confusion over blast onboard EgyptAir flight

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00:00:00
>> Confusion if whether there was a blast on board the Egypt Air flight which crashed into the sea on Thursday. An Egyptian forensics official says examination of the human remains suggests there was an explosion. No traces of explosives have been detected. But the Egyptian head of forensics denies the reports, saying the theories are based on mere assumptions.
00:00:21
Reuters Global Aerospace Correspondent Tim Hoffa explains.>> They'll only be sure if they actually find chemical residue or traces of an explosion, gas, vapor or shrapnel, or something like that. In the absence of it, they can't be entirely certain. Because we know that even in cases where we know that aircraft were brought down by a bomb, like the Lockerbie disaster in 1988, most of the passengers weren't found with blast injuries or shrapnel.
00:00:55
>> French investigators say the plane sent a series of warnings indicating that smoke had been detected on board, as well as other possible computer faults shortly before it disappeared.>> But that isn't really enough to say exactly what that was caused by. We don't know also whether that was the origin of whatever happened to that plane or the consequence of whatever happened to that plane.
00:01:18
So it's very difficult for Investigators, and even Airbus, who know that plane better than anybody else, to connect these little fragments together. So what they really need to do is to find those black boxes, which will contain a lot more data. And data which has been specifically designed in order to help solve these types of accidents.
00:01:40
>> The rescuers have less than 30 days until the batteries die on two underwater beacons designed to guide them to the flight recorders. Changes to treble the life of the batteries were first recommended in 2009, but won't come into effect until 2018, too late to help find Egypt Air 804.