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Health

VERBATIM: We're dealing with "nightmare bacteria"

Opening sequence

Opening sequence

Health

VERBATIM: We're dealing with "nightmare bacteria"

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COMING UP:VERBATIM: We're dealing with "nightmare bacteria"

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Transcript

00:00:00
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MUSIC]
00:00:05
We risk being in a post-antibiotic world, and that wouldn't just be for infections that you think of as bad infections, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, that's bad enough. That could be for the 600,000 Americans a year who need cancer treatment for whom we just assume will be able to treat infections.
00:00:24
We may lose that ability. Just a few hours ago, the Department of Defense released information about a woman with no travel outside of the US, who is the first documented human case in the United States of having a urinary tract infection or any infection with an organism resistant to every antibiotic including the last one we had, colistin.
00:00:52
It was an old antibiotic, but it was the only one left for what I've called nightmare bacteria. We know now that the more we look, the more we're going to find. And the more we look at drug resistance, the more concerned we are. We need to do a very comprehensive job protecting antibiotics so that we can have them and our children can have them.
00:01:12
We need to make new antibiotics but must be have better stewardship and better identification of outbreaks, we will lose these miracle drugs. The medicine cabinet is empty for some patients. It is the end of the road for antibiotics unless we act urgently.