FIRST AIRED: June 3, 2016

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Transcript

00:00:02
>> Chicago officials stepping up to gain back public trust on Friday, releasing video, audio and other documents of 101 cases under investigation involving a police shooting or other use of force incidents. Some content very graphic. The independent police review authority or IPRA, a police watchdog which released the content has been criticized for not doing more about police brutality, especially against African-Americans.
00:00:30
Reuters correspondent, Fiona Ortiz, in Chicago says IPRA was created out of a similar uproar over police misconduct about a decade ago.>> This time the mayor is saying he's going to completely overhaul IPRA. It might even get a new name. It's supposed to get more money, but Chicago is in a huge budget crisis.
00:00:49
So, where that money and staff would come from is anybody's guess.>> Chicago Ramun Manuel has been under pressure to resign over the incidents. And, the city has been criticized for dragging its feet on releasing a video showing white officer Jason Van Dyke shooting 17 year old Laquan McDonald, who was black, 16 times.
00:01:09
Van Dyke was eventually charged with murder, but the incident further strained relations between the police and the public. Ortiz says releasing the material could help.>> I think the effect that is happening is that police are being more careful now. Police shootings in Chicago came down quite significantly last year and also this year.
00:01:28
>> The Watchdog said, in the future it will make public large quantities of information about police use of force on a website including videos from police body cameras and police car dashboard cameras.