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00:00:02
>> A day trip getaway just short of the North Korean border. A half hour drive from Seoul is the city of Paju. The sight of some of the fiercest battles in the Korean war. But today despite its proximity to, Kim Jong Un's nuclear regime, Korean Tourism Board says, it's a place where fairy tales come true.
00:00:19
Featuring two massive outlet malls and a European style village named after Provence, France. It's not far from South Korea's only enemy cemetery, where North Korean and Chinese soldiers are buried. And as Reuters reports for Paju's visitors, Pyongyang's missiles seem like empty threats.>> I spoke to one of the residents here, and his place was in range of artillery of fires exchange to two Koreans in the 1970's.
00:00:47
And at that time, he dug up a bunker on his back yard against possible North Korean attacks. But young couples and family members I spoke to, said they don't care about a North Korean threat at all. And as you can see, the shopping mall not only features designer brands like Armani and Kors.
00:01:07
It features other entertainment facilities like a mini train, and a merry-go-round, and a playground for children.>> After a day out with the family, visitors can peep through a telescope across the border at the north. Or take home some souvenirs to remember their close encounter. It all takes a lot of the bite out of Pyongyang's bark.
00:01:27
>> I think it's more of a show or performance. North Korea doesn't really intend to endanger us. It's just provoking us. I don't feel it's a big threat.>> There are at least 10,000 artillery guns pointing towards the south. North Korea's propaganda claims that any moment they can turn Seoul into a quote sea or fire.
00:01:45
that's a dooms day threat that's played on repeat for years. And with memories of the war fading among the young, many South Koreans seems to have stopped listening.