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00:00:00
>> North Korea has not>> As Donald Trump's fire and fury comments step up tensions with North Korea, some experts are getting worried about a lack of channels that could prevent the situation from spinning out of control. Back in the Cold War era, the US and Russia set up hotlines and satellites to communicate and keep track of each others military developments.
00:00:20
But as Reuters' Jonathan Landay reports, no safety net like that exists with Pyongyang.>> Trump's comments were off the cuff and were quite inflammatory. In cases where you have these crisis management mechanisms, the United States would be able to get in touch with, say, Russia to explain what the president really meant, that he didn't mean the United States was on the verge of attacking Russia.
00:00:46
In the case of North Korea, there are very few avenues by which the United States can contact North Korea and put Trump's comments into context.>> With no diplomatic relations, there's just a handful of low-key ways for the two sides to try and calm things down. The UN in New York, their embassies in China, or at the border between the North and South.
00:01:07
But experts say that may not stand up in a crisis. It took decades to set up the Moscow-Washington hotline and even then glitches in the system brought the two sides close to conflict.>> There have in fact been such incidents which many of which included malfunctions of early warning systems that created perceptions that perhaps one side is getting ready to attack the other.
00:01:30
Thankfully, none of those incidents led to a war and we're in fact deescalated very quickly.>> One of the last secure lines of communication was cut four years ago. A channel between the North and South that Kim Jong-un has refused to restore. And then in the words of one analyst public statements and tweets simply won't be enough to entangle today's crisis.