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00:00:00
>>
SOUND] W
at happens when a prehistoric predator clashes with the advance of modern development? That's the conundrum in Abidjan, the Ivory Coast's biggest city. And Reuters Joe Bouvier has been hearing about one solution.>> And it's experienced one of the fastest economic growth rates in the world over the last six years.
00:00:20
That's fed into a construction boom that's led to development along the city's lagoon water front. This is a traditional habitat for crocodiles. What that essentially means is that there's more possibility of contact between humans as they expand closer to the water's edge and to crocodiles who are already there.
00:00:41
>> In a bid to prevent a confrontation between Abidjan's five million human residents and their reptilian cohabitants, a government backed scheme is teaching rescue workers and forestry agents how to humanely capture crocs.>>
FOREIGN]
> The efforts are being led by American Conservation Biologist, Matt Shirley. On this moonlit night, Shirley and team cruise the shoreline of a half billion dollar development project, looking for crocodiles.
00:01:08
It's not as dangerous a pastime as you may think.>> Crocodiles that we have here, fortunately, for the most part, it's a very small species that are actually quite timid. And there's not many records of attack on people. I think the last record is something like 30, 40 years ago.
00:01:21
>> The concern is that fear of the crocodiles could lead to a violent backlash against them.>> We do have neighborhoods that go right up to the water's edge. People just aren't used to living near them anymore.>> Once the crocodiles are caught they are relocated to a national park outside the city, a safe distance away from any noisy neighbors.