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>> President Trump's administration fleshing out plans to ramp up immigration enforcement on Tuesday, saying those who enter the country illegally as children won't have to worry about being deported but many others facing a crackdown. I'm Andy Sullivan in Washington where Homeland Security officials are unveiling detailed plans that follow through on one of Trump's central campaign promises.
Officials are trying to lower the temperature saying this won't lead to a mass round up but they're already getting a fierce backlash from immigration advocates in countries like Mexico.>> It's big stuff.>> Following up on an executive order signed by Trump last month, Homeland Security says, it plans to speed up the deportation process, hire a thousands of new agents and target more of the 11 million people who are in the country illegally.
>> The President is empowering DHS to carry out the immigration laws currently on the books and to repatriate illegal immigrants swiftly.>> That's a big change from former President Barack Obama's administration which focused on deporting hardened criminals and those with ties to terrorist groups. One group that can breathe easy the so-called Dreamers who were brought into the country when they were children will be allowed to keep their work permits under protections first set up by Obama.
Trump had vowed to get rid of that program known as DACA during the campaign but he has softened his stance in recent weeks. But the concession is little comfort for other illegal immigrants as Homeland Security plans to target more people for deportation and get them out of the country more quickly.
They'll now have to wait out the process behind bars rather than out in the community. Trump doing away with a program known as Catch and Release, that means they can be locked up for more than a year before they can make their case to a judge. It's gonna be awhile before these policies take effect.
Homeland Security already has trouble hiring enough qualified border guards, for example. So don't expect it to fill these 15,000 new agent positions any time soon. And it's not clear how much this going to cost or whether congress is gonna be willing to pay for it. But after years of declining enforcement under Obama, it's looking like Trump is gonna make this a priority again that's sure to cheer his nationalist supporters and send ripples of fear through immigrant communities.