FIRST AIRED: February 2, 2017

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Transcript

00:00:02
>> President Donald Trump's next salvo against immigration could hit Facebook particularly hard. I'm Reuters' Stephen Nellis. And there's a draft executive order floating around right now that could affect so-called H-1B visas. That are relied upon heavily by the tech industry. Facebook uses an unusually high number of these.
00:00:20
They're classified as what's known as dependents on the H-1B visa. Which basically means that 15% or more of their entire US headcount is on that visa. Now, we also checked this for Google, for Amazon, for Apple, and Microsoft. None of those other companies have this status. So President Donald Trump, along with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, have long been critics of the H1B visa program.
00:00:44
They say that it can be abused in a way that displaces American workers. Typically, where we see this, is in situations like those that happened at Disney, or Southern California Edison. Where a company will hire a contractor company to come in. And replace most of its information technology staff with contractors who are on these H-1B visas.
00:01:06
Now we do know that Facebook actually pays its H-1B visa employees quite high, in fact about $145,000. Which, even in the very expensive San Francisco Bay area where I'm standing, is still pretty good money. However, depending on how changes to the program are implemented. Even with those high paying jobs, Facebook could still come under more pressure than its other rivals in the technology industry.