FIRST AIRED: January 18, 2017

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00:00:01
>> Turning up the heat on the climate change debate, scientists are in Davos to warn of a warming Arctic. I'm
INAUDIBL
] here, in a mockup of an Arctic base camp. Why? Well, it's all part of a call to action on climate change here at the World Economic Forum.
00:00:17
And on everyone's mind is whether climate change skeptics may soon be walking into the White House. Donald Trump has previously called climate change a hoax and threatened to pull out of global emissions curbs agreed in Paris. But one of the architects of that deal says such a move would mainly hurt America.
00:00:35
>> It is troubling, and I'm very concerned, actually, for the health of the US economy and for their competitiveness. There are, in the United States, ten times more jobs in renewable energy than there are in coal.>> A collaboration of leading scientific, business, and political figures pitching their tents in Davos.
00:00:54
Their warning, climate change is a dire threat for business as well as the planet. The main exponent, former Democratic Vice President and environmentalist Al Gore. But he met with Donald Trump in December. And here in Davos, despite repeated questions I put to him, he refused to be drawn on whether Trump is bad news for global warming campaigners.
00:01:15
>> But, if you talk about moral compasses, it's not a set back since Paris agreement.>> You're trying to get a really newsworthy quote.>>
LAUGH]>>
Since his win, President-Elect Trump has been more tight-lipped on climate change.
00:01:34
>>
APPLAUSE
>> Even the most ardent global warming campaigners hope he's still someone they can work with. But there's anxiety in the air. A new US administration is blowing in Friday. Nobody knows what direction it will go.