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COMING UP:Share Opener Variant 4

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00:00:00
>> All right, hey, Escibido.>> More NATO members should pay their way. That's just one of the controversial campaign claims from America's new Commander-in- Chief. But does President Trump have a point?>> America is by some way the main NATO spender. Case in point, exercises like this enrolls again in Poland.
00:00:19
I'm Reuters' reporter Jacob Greaves. We are here you'll hear lots about all NATO members contributing, participating. But there is only a very few who actually meet the 2% spending threshold.>> The alliance charter ask members to devote 2% of their GDP to defense. Only the U.S., Britain, Estonia, Greece, and Poland currently do.
00:00:44
That's out of 28 members. Now, Poland has become a staging ground for US troop deployments agreed under President Obama. And when we spoke to those units training, they were keen to accentuate the positive.>> All 28 play a vital role in this. And I think, we all bring some sort of competitive advantage to the table and we all bring some talents to the table.
00:01:08
And I think that's just the strength of NATO.>> The highest ranking US army official in Europe expanded on the point to us saying that American fire power buys other members time.>> That also enables our other allies to focus on building up their own defenses.>> Other members are upping their military spend.
00:01:31
Looking down the barrel of a revitalized Russia and American isolationism. Baltic states Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia are reportedly eyeing 2018 budgets with big defense boosts.
SOUND] T
ough the sum's still paltry compared to the US, Donald Trump might've floated a Pay-as-you-Go NATO, but in its main military theater, American hardware is the hard currency.