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00:00:00
>>
FOREIGN]
> In a corner of India, famous for its tea and silk, Muslims are living in fear of being driven out of the country. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's nationalist party is at the front of a years long campaign to weed out illegal Muslim immigrants. They now face being sent back over the border to Bangladesh, but rights activists say the drive is also targeting actual Indian citizens.
00:00:26
Reuters Krishna Dosh travelled to the north eastern state of Assam to meet villagers whose future is in question, like 26-year-old Marzina Bibbi.>> She lives here with her husband. She was arrested last year and she was in jail for eight months. Her crime, she was a suspect of Bangladeshi living in a slum.
00:00:47
Eventually she was able to produce all the documents that proved her innocence and she was able to come out of jail>> India has mobilized around 60,000 police and troops as the local government gets ready to publish a final list of citizens. To make the list people have had to show documents proving they or their families lived in the country before March 24th 1971.
00:01:11
That's two days before a civil war in Bangladesh sent a flood of refugees across the border into India. A draft list has already been published, but many Muslims in say although they have documents, their names are not on it, including Bibi.>> She tells me she's not worried.
00:01:32
She says she has all the documents to prove that she's an Indian citizen and whatever she said to me, she was very firm in that, and she believes that. She might be poor but it doesn't mean that she is illegal.>> The government denies it's running an anti-Muslim drive, but that's hard for some to swallow.
00:01:52
Local authorities say they will strip any illegal Muslims they find of their constitutional rights, leaving the question of deportation to the central government. The central government says if the refugees are Hindu, they can stay.