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00:00:02
>> With last year's US drones sales topping a billion dollars for the first time, more Americans than ever are flying the unmanned aerial vehicles and not always sober. That's why New Jersey is slated to vote Monday on a bill approved by the state Senate to ban drunk droning.
00:00:20
Reuters correspondent Barbara Goldberg.>> A lot of states became increasingly concerned about drone operation regulation after an incident in 2015 involving the White House. It's reportedly, an intelligence officer who was a little inebriated was flying a drone off a friend's balcony and it blew onto the White House lawn.
00:00:43
And so Congress was really consumed with talking about the need for drone regulation after that.>> 38 states are considering new legislation and restrictions for drones. New Jersey's legislation would impose a punishment of up to six months in prison and a $1,000 fine for inebriated or drugged droning.
00:01:02
>> So I talked to a bunch of drone operators, and while they use real expensive equipment. I mean a crash could mean a loss of a thousand dollars for a piece of equipment. And they say they would never risk drunken droning. They do admit that they've been a little tipsy and flown tiny little drones.
00:01:21
And they do worry about overreach. They worry about things like an open container law being passed where if anybody has an open container at a party, nobody can drone. And they don't like that idea.>> If the New Jersey Bill is passed it falls on outgoing governor Chris Christie, to sign it into law, before he leaves office in less than two weeks.
00:01:42
If he doesn't, then the legislation is dead and drunken droning in New Jersey will live to fly another day.
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