FIRST AIRED: November 16, 2017

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

×

Transcript

00:00:02
>> It's a public art initiative called Portals. Gold shipping containers, more than 20 around the globe, providing live face-to-face encounters with total strangers. This one in New York's Time Square, transporting us to Herat, Afghanistan, where we meet brothers Omid and Saeed Habibi.>> When you tell an American that you are from Afghanistan, what is the reaction that you get?
00:00:25
>> They were surprised to see that we have Internet in our country. That we have a university that this portal is located inside a university campus. That girls are coming in the portal and talking English. That girls are studying. But, the people will have no idea about it.
00:00:42
People are always seeing that through like mainstream media that there was this explosion happened in Afghanistan, there was a lot of people were killed. That's the whole definition of Afghanistan for them.>> Portal's founder, Omar Bakhshi, says he's using the web to, quote, carve wormholes through the world.
00:01:04
>> So that's the original vision. Basically how do you use technology to get out of your own bubble rather than deeper into it.>> The Portal's often providing an intimacy that's sometimes easier with strangers. Speaking to us from an open portal in Malaga, Spain, her face obscured by the backdrop of daylight, a Russian tourist explains why she's trying to move her family out of Russia to Poland.
00:01:27
>> Have you heard about Stalin's time?>> Yes, definitely.>> Stalin's period of Russian history? It seems that now it is a repetition of this period, but it's more hidden. It looks like people have no flexibility to express their minds.>> The experience is sometimes so deep, you may find yourself wanting to reach through the screen.
00:01:52
>> We can just about hold hands.