FIRST AIRED: December 8, 2017

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>> 18 months in the making, and the UK finally has something to show for all this Brexit talk.>> I very much welcome the prospect of moving ahead to the next phase, to talk about trade and security, and to discuss the positive and ambitious future relationship that is in all of our interests.
>> Britain and the European Union agreed to the initial terms of their divorce deal on Friday. Now the pressure's off for Theresa May after months of problematic to and fro with Brussels. But it could be short-lived. Next up are the more complex transition and trade deal talks. And as Reuters' Mark John reports, this new agreement could be merely smoke and mirrors.
>> It looks very much as if they're kind of kicking the can down the road to a certain extent. What they've said is that we hope the future EU-UK trade deal is so free, and is so much likely being in the single market as it is in the moment.
Then in fact this question about the Irish north-south border becomes almost irrelevant, because it will be so transparent.>> On the flip side, it's the remainers who might be celebrating this deal the most, cuz it hints at a so-called soft Brexit in the making. In it, the UK would retain close ties the EU, because of this pledge regarding the border with Ireland.
>> In Northern Ireland we will guarantee there will be no hard border and we will uphold the Belfast agreement.>> And there's a sense of relief from say, entities like the British Chamber of Commerce who say, this is good, what's happened today. Now can we please crack on with the transition, and do what we can to actually increase that sense of certainty for business operators.
>> Any celebration could be muted. Throughout this process, Brexiteers in May's own Conservative Party have been among her most vocal critics, fighting any sign of a soft Brexit, and those critics aren't going anywhere.