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00:00:02
>> Thousands of mornings have begun with Buddhist chants at this monastery in remote Mongolia.>>
FOREIGN]
00:00:27
This monastery once housed 800 monks, but today it's home to just 40. Only four years into his own studies, 29-year-old Lom Sang Tai Yang already has two novice monks under him.>>
00:00:48
>> Reuters' photojournalist Thomas Peter journeyed out to document them, 20 miles from the nearest road.>> Seeing a monastery that is run by people who are so young, it felt a little bit like, it had a little bit the atmosphere of a start-up. But it was very difficult to photograph and there was only in the evening I finally managed to get that image, when after a long two hour session of prayers, a dog came along.
00:01:12
Who seems to be a regular guest at the monastery. And they started running around after they finished their prayers, running around with the dog, chasing him, chasing each other.>> The monastery has just been declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, it dates back to the 18th century. Today, just over half of the original temples remain and many have been taken over by flocks of birds.
00:01:34
It's a stark contrast to the modern world, and the monks say finding new children to sign up isn't easy. But keeping them there is the real challenge.>> There are mobile phones, only those older than 25 are allowed to use them. But of course, even the younger ones knows what's in there in the digital world.
00:01:51
The life inside the monastery is a stark choice, and as a pull to the outside world, it's not everyone can resist.>> At least for now, 11-year-old Tamuren says, he's committed to life as a monk. He says, he hopes the monastery will grow, and more children will join them in taking up the vows.
00:02:06
>>