FIRST AIRED: May 22, 2019

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

×

Transcript

00:00:00
a week after San Francisco voted to ban city departments from buying and using facial recognition technology Amazon on Wednesday will hold a vote of its own at its annual shareholder meeting in Seattle where investors will weigh whether Amazon should sell its surveillance software the law enforcement and government agencies some lawmakers and civil liberties groups have called the new technology a threat to privacy and civil rights ACLU attorney mac Kay goal is in that camp Amazon has failed to recognize the dangers and to act on the dangers of its face surveillance technology so shareholders of stepped up and they've brought to proposals to Amazon's annual shareholder meeting asking the company to take responsibility before its bottom line and its reputation take a bigger hit the first proposal asked the company to prohibit sales of its Amazon recognition product to government agencies the other asks Amazon to commission an independent audit to determine what harm if any the technology poses Reuters correspondent Jeffrey dastan is covering the shareholder meeting these shareholder resolutions face an uphill battle because Amazon CEO Jeff bases on sixteen percent of the company and consequently has a large chunk of the vote even achieving twenty five thirty five percent , of the eight a yes vote from shareholders will be a major symbolic victory for civil liberty groups that have , raise concerns about face recognition technology and possibly given shareholder interest if it's that high the company might end up doing something different anyway even if the resolution themselves don't pass just before Amazon's annual meeting gets underway on Wednesday the house oversight committee will hold a hearing on facial recognition technology and its impact on the public's right to privacy