FIRST AIRED: April 9, 2019

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00:00:00
nine pro democracy activists arrived in the Hong Kong courts Tuesday where they were found guilty of charges tied to the city's occupy movement which could face at least seven years in jail they were leaders of mass protests in twenty fourteen which brought parts of the city to a standstill critics say their trial shows political freedoms are disappearing in the former British colony that is now under Chinese rule , outside the court scores of supporters held yellow umbrellas and pro democracy placards pro government supporters were also present some demanding the nine to serve prison time , all nine defendants appeared outside the court vowing to continue to push for their right to vote freely for the city's leader and lawmakers as written in the city's many constitution the so called basic law , the judge handed down the verdict on public nuisance charges but did not immediately give any sentences three of the nine activists been you try Changin man in seventy five year old pastor true you Ming were accused of leading the city they had pled not guilty to all charges Tuesday's verdict was the latest in a series of trials that have seen many Hong Kong pro democracy activists jailed many people today , with me to get a bill continue to strive for Hong Kong's democracy and will process on and we will not give up , twenty fourteen occupy protests are seen by many as Beijing's biggest populace challenge in decades they blocked major roads for seventy nine days before being cleared by police and without winning any democratic concessions from Beijing since the nineteen ninety seven handover when Hong Kong was returned from British to Chinese rule critics say China has broken its promise to maintain Hong Kong's high degree of autonomy under what's labeled the one country two systems arrangement