FIRST AIRED: July 15, 2019

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00:00:00
in an effort to crack down on a surge of central American asylum seekers entering the United States the trump administration is taking steps to make asylum claims more difficult an interim rule announced Monday puts the onus on migrants coming by land to first seek shelter in another country this is known as a third country roots many of the recent arrivals are families from Guatemala Honduras and El Salvador and cross through at least one other country before reaching the U. S. border in many cases the fleeing criminal gangs and rampant poverty the US government has sought to stem the tide of migrants fleeing north many of whom cross the border and then surrendered to immigration agents in a statement announcing the new proposal the department of justice and homeland security said the rule would relieve a backlog of asylum claims many of which the government said were ultimately found to be without merit US immigration authorities have been overwhelmed by the weave of migrants reports of dangerous overcrowding disease and malnutrition at U. S. detention centers for adults and children these women were being told I CDP officers to drink out of the toilet sparked protests and vigils in American cities over the weekend demanding a humanitarian solution the White House has been searching for ways to relieve the strain it's pressured Mexico to stop central Americans from crossing through to the US we're not in the hospital business when the border security business Donald Trump declared a national emergency and sought funds to construct a border wall but he may not be able to unilaterally rewrite a silent rules the American civil liberties union immediately challenged the change if the new rule does go into effect it's not clear how the central American nations who might be forced to first process asylum claims will respond