FIRST AIRED: October 26, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> The slot machine was my lover. I mean I was literally having an affair with a slot machine.>> Jeff Wasserman is a recovering gambling addict. His addiction cost him his job, his retirement saving, and he says that when he hit rock bottom it almost cost him his life.
00:00:18
>> The first option was suicide. I felt that was a path that could finally take the pain away.>> But he chose instead to come clean about his addiction to his family who called the Delaware Council on Gambling Problems where he now works.>> Delaware Council on Gambling Problems.
00:00:39
>> It's one of a growing number of publicly funded programs that are facing a financial crunch even as US states expand legal gambling to include sports betting.>> Place your bets.>> Reuter's correspondent Laila Kearney explains.>> Typically when states expand gambling that is when they increase funds for gambling addiction services or when they've created funds in the past.
00:01:02
Now, we're seeing this pretty quick expansion of sports betting, states legalizing sports betting and proposing bills to do so. But you're not seeing much in the way of expanding funds to prevent and treat gambling addiction.>> Eight states have legalized full scale sports betting since the Supreme Court lifted a federal ban on it in May.
00:01:22
But most of those states have not agreed to dedicate any of the revenue from sports betting to gambling addiction programs. Delaware, which was the first state to launch legal sports betting is in that majority, and Wasserman says that imbalance is going to create problems.>> I don't need research, data, statistics for me to accept the fact that the more opportunity people have to gamble, the more you're going to have problem gamblers or addicted gamblers.