FIRST AIRED: November 6, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:01
>> Bill Gates has been busy in his second life as a billionaire philanthropist.. On Tuesday in China, he took the next step in his crusade against poverty and disease by showing the room a jar of poop.>> This is a container of human feces.>> He's pointing to what the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation sees as a big problem, bad sanitation.
00:00:24
As he says in developing countries there's way more of what's in the jar on the streets. They say it kills half a million children under the age of five every year, and cost the world $200 billion in healthcare costs.>> They smell terrible.>> So now he wants to reinvent the toilet.
00:00:45
On Tuesday he unveiled one that turns waste to fertilizer, no water required.>> The current toilet simply sends the waste away in the water. Whereas, these toilets they don't have that sewer, this is non-sewered sanitation. And so they take both the liquids and solids and do chemical work on it, including burning it, in most cases.
00:01:10
So that at most, you have some ash that isn't smelling bad and doesn't have any disease in it.>> Gates looks at waterless toilets as a paradigm shift, not unlike the move to personal computing in the 70s.>> In the same way that a personal computer is sorta self-contained, not a gigantic thing, can we do this chemical processing actually at the household level?
00:01:40
>> Despite the surprising display, Gates may have had an eager audience in Beijing. Chinese leader Xi Jinping is promoting a three-year toilet revolution to overhaul or build tens of thousands of public washrooms.