FIRST AIRED: December 31, 2018

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00:00:00
>> An army of projectile firing drones is policing the skies of Spain, their target a plague of Asian Hornets that are attacking the bee population on the Iberian peninsula. The hornets have steadily been taking over since entering Spanish airspace in 2010. They have no natural predator, though they do now have a manmade one.
00:00:20
Organized by the Asian Hornet Association, the journey's fire a pay load of insecticide into Hornet nest that are too high to be accessed by other means.>> We feel the projectiles with the product perform a flight in front of the nest at 10 or 15 meters of distance and shoot the projectiles with a percentage success of 90 Close to 100%.
00:00:41
>> Experts say the plague is moving 35 kilometers southwards each year, increasing exponentially as each individual next can generate between 50 and 100 new nests. Yet, there remains no national plan to control the outbreak.>> It's curious that very few public institutions are taking part on a scientific level.
00:01:02
I think on the scientific level they're not taking it with the seriousness they should, cuz it's a very serious problem. Our country's the main honey exporter for Europe.>> As well as establishing the honey bee industry butterfly numbers are also down. The Asian Hornets Association say it's helped neutralize around 15,000 nest in northern Spain and Portugal since 2012