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00:00:00
I need to European airlines pilots is given which is a damning picture of the circumstances before the crash of one of its Boeing seven three seven Max jets in focus a new automated system dubbed M. Cass meant to stop the plane flying too slowly it may have pushed the nose down off to Raleigh deciding the S. speed was dangerously low the source says Boeing never provided any manuals for the system he says pilots learned more about it from media reports simulators for the Max also in short supply with Ethiopian only recently getting one crash pilot yeah read get to chew had been to a refresher course on it at the end of March pilots older model seven three sevens were only required to do a computer based conversion course to qualify on the Max over in Jakarta on Thursday investigators reveal details of what's on the black box recording from October's crash then he added what about I at the end of the flight it seemed the pilots felt he could no longer cover the flight that's when the panic can manage time was told that it was a a , voice recorder shows how pilots desperately checked the manual to figure out why that plane kept nose diving , which is Jamie free just following the story in Singapore , for Boeing is been a severe impact in a severe blow to its reputation has had over three hundred and seventy planes grounded as a result of this indefinitely and it's also has the regulators looking over the certification process so it is very unclear at this stage when these planes could allow it can be flying again , it is now face close to testify before the US Congress lawmakers want to know whether they and regulators underestimated the amount of training needed for the new model of jet