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COMING UP:Share Opener Variant 3

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00:00:00
has any have you have you ever seen anything like no one is ever going to live here is ever saying like what Illinois farmer jeans McCuen is talking about is rain lots of it which has turned his fields into muddy ponds we really don't know what the order forms as I was with my dad so I was a kid we never had a year off make your own was unable to plant eighty five percent of his intended corny cars this year and he's not alone am standing in a muddy field just last week Reuters correspondent temple Lansing visited mineral Illinois one of the worst hit counties this your farmers across the Midwest were unable to plant millions of acres of corn this spring because of heavy rains many thought that they would eventually have a chance to put their crops in the ground but the rains just kept coming now they are struggling to figure out how to make money without having crops to grow the weather related problems are hitting the entire industry last planting means farmers need less seed herbicides and equipment than expected Harding overall sales adding pain to the sector you're is a flow crop prices and the US China trade war that is slowing agricultural exports to help farmers hurt by fewer sales to China the US government announced a sixteen billion dollar aid package but only those who managed to plant a crop are eligible for payments so make kun took it upon himself to cheer up fellow farmers in his town nothing good has happened a long time and able to help my friends you know media together , talk about this and recently hosted a party at a local restaurant dozens of corn farmers and others in the business showed up and over beers and fried chicken the swap stories and prayed the sun would come out again