FIRST AIRED: January 31, 2019

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00:00:00
>>
SOUND] I
the slums of mega city Manila, it can be tough to survive. 40-year old Reynaldo Diaz lives in a small shelter along the rail lines of the Philippines capital. Diaz has two sons, and he supports them in an ingenious way. He's one of Manila's trolley boys.
00:00:20
They earn a living pushing these makeshift carts along the city's train tracks.>>
FOREIGN]
> This is the Philippine National Railways track which is borrowing it from them.>> It's a low tech solution, but Manila's trolley boys play a big role in keeping the city's public transport and their own lives on track.
00:00:40
Every morning thousands of Manila's residents flock to the tracks to take these trolleys in and out of the city.>>
00:01:01
The trolley boys say there's never been anyone injured or killed on the carts, but there is some danger involve. The biggest risk? The larger, faster riders on the tracks.>>
00:01:22
Those in front of us will give us a heads up too.>> The Philippines National Railroad company used to operate about a hundred train stations in and around Manila. But use of neglect mean only around a third of the city's rail network is running today. And the trolley boys only offered their service on one stretch of track that runs for a bit under 20 miles.
00:01:42
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