FIRST AIRED: January 27, 2019

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> No deal, no Brexit, delayed Brexit, or even a second referendum. It's an uncertain time for Britain, and it's especially emotionally stressful for EU nationals living there. That's why dozens of anxious Europeans gathered at this Swedish church in London to listen to a talk about the psychological impact of Brexit by psychotherapist Susie Orbach.
00:00:24
>> There was absolute shock and confusion. And for some people, who may have even been brought up here in England, but to have not ever turned themselves into citizens, it's been very confusing and quite scary.>> Monday marked the first day that European citizens currently resident in the UK could register for settled status.
00:00:51
But a research group warned that many could be left out in the cold without legal standing. Freelance writer Annette Pullner has lived in the UK for 30 years.>> But all this makes it so difficult for me to get up everyday and live my life. I want to hide under, in my bed, but instead I come to places like this and I'm thinking maybe here we can talk to each other.
00:01:15
We can be open with each other, so hard to live with so much fear. It's really really difficult..>> This gathering isn't the only one in it's kind. London Existential Academy has also launched a scheme offering free counseling to Europeans who are experiencing Brexit-related anxiety. To soothe that unease, immigration minister Caroline Knopes has promised that the post-Brexit settlement scheme for EU citizens will be easy and straightforward to use.
00:01:46
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t despite reassurances about the process, there's still palpable apprehension, and in some cases, fear over what could happen next.
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