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00:00:00
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00:00:01
Zimbabwe looks on course for another president from the former party of Robert Mugabe. In its first election since he was ousted, results from a parliamentary power point to win for ZANU–PF. The country is still waiting for the outcome of a presidential vote, that has been marred by allegations of irregularities.
00:00:19
But the Zimbabwe electoral commission said Wednesday that ZANU–PF had won majority of seats in parliament. 109 compared to the opposition Movement for Democratic Changes 41, with 58 yet to be declared. If it wins another 30 seats, ZANU-PF will have the two-thirds majority required to change the constitution at will.
00:00:42
With voters expected to pick a presidential candidate based on their party affiliation, the stage is set for incumbent Emmerson Mnangagwa, a former Mugabe confidant, to retain power. Western diplomats and local observer groups had set the race which saw a high 75% turn out was too close to call.
00:01:02
The results reflect a divide in Zimbabwe, as Reuters McDonald Dzirutwe explains.>> Zimbabwe is a politically divided country. Divided between the rural and the urban. In the rural areas, many Zimbabwe's, the majority of them support the ruling party which they have done since the days of liberation struggle.
00:01:21
>> The results indicate that ZANU-PF has swept up rural constituencies by huge margins. While the opposition MDC let by 40 year old Nelson Chamisa has won in most urban centers.>> On Wednesday, Chamisa accused the electoral commission of preparing Zimbabweans for quote, fake presidential results, adding to MDC claims the day before of deliberate delays and irregularities.
00:01:45
>> There was no rigging.>> The commission says there was no rigging or cheating in the vote. The credibility of which is vital to the country. Zimbabwe hopes a clean election will put an end to its prior status and help it attract foreign investors.