FIRST AIRED: August 3, 2018

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00:00:00
>> After the falling out, Turkey and the U.S. are trying to patch things up. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and Turkish Foreign Minister, Mevlut Cavusoglu talking in Singapore. This after relations between the NATO allies sunk to their lowest point in decades. On Wednesday the U.S. slapped sanctions on two Turkish ministers over the case of Andrew Brunson, a US pastor on trial in Turkey, for backing terrorism.
00:00:28
The White House says it sees no evidence Brunson has done anything wrong. But as Reuters Turkey Bureau Chief Dominic Evans points out, there are other issues at stake.>> Andrew Brunson, the Christian pastor, has been very much the public face of this crisis between the United States and Turkey.
00:00:43
But Washington is also very keen to secure the release of three of its consular staff in Turkey. Two of them have been detained for more than a year. They're very anxious that they should be freed as well, and this dispute over Brunson and the consular staff. Comes against a backdrop of much wider problems between the United States and Turkey.
00:01:04
>> Turkey says the sanctions on the justice and interior minister don't achieve anything, but the U.S. could impose more if this rumbles on.>> There could well be more steps along those lines if the Americans don't see any movement from Turkey. If they don't see any sign of progress towards Pastor Brunson or other detainees being released.
00:01:24
The next steps would most likely be further sanctions against Turkish figures.>> Pompeo telling reporters the U.S. had put Turkey on notice. That the clock had run out and it was time for Pastor Brunson to be returned. The U.S. sanctions sent the Turkish lira to record lows again on Friday.
00:01:42
And while Turkey has vowed to retaliate, an increasingly troubled economy could leave it vulnerable to new actions.