FIRST AIRED: February 12, 2019

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

We've got more news

Get our editor’s daily email summary of what’s going on in the world.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Replay Program
0:00
0:00
More Info

COMING UP:Share Opener Variant 4

×

Transcript

00:00:00
least just two weeks before US president Donald Trump travels to Vietnam for a planned a second summit with Kim Jong moon says North Korea has continued to produce bomb fuel while in denuclearization talks with the United States may have produced enough of it in the past year to add as many as seven nuclear weapons to its arsenal my relationship with Kim John on is a good one truck described talks in Pyongyang last week as very productive but the state department has offered no sign of progress the capabilities and threat as it existed year ago are still there and a week before that the country's top intelligence chief long range said that North Korea was unlikely to completely give up its nuclear weapons we currently assess that North Korea will seek to retain its W. M. D. capabilities because its leaders ultimately view nuclear weapons as critical to regime survival however the report done by Stanford University says that the country's freeze on nuclear and missile testing since twenty seventeen means that north Korea's weapons program probably poses less of a threat than it did at the end of that year the Stanford experts also said it was their assessment that North Korea cannot deliver a nuclear warhead with any measure of confidence to the U. S. mainland but said his nuclear weapons were still a real threat to Japan and South Korea after an unprecedented first trump Kim summit last June the north Korean leader pledged to work toward denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and even invited a handful of journalists to watch the dismantling of a nuclear test site but one of the report's authors told Reuters that it was understandable the North Korea continued its weapons work even that it had reached no specific agreement in the latest talks with the United States to halt it