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COMING UP:Share Opener Variant 3

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Transcript

00:00:00
I had a lot of good things happening I I mean I think you see that some US president Donald Trump in Chinese vice premier Li %HESITATION hook on Friday expressed cautious optimism they would reach a deal to end their bitter trade war but suggested more time would likely be needed it's I would say it's probably more likely that the deal does happen , but that doesn't mean it's going to happen from China we believe that it is very likely that it will happen and we hope that they will have a deal the oval office meeting capped several days of intense talks during which negotiators for the first time put outlines of a potential deal on paper the outlines included six areas of understanding on structural issues like forced technology transfers and cyber theft intellectual property rights in currency controls that marked the biggest sign of progress yet in the talks but sources say the sides are struggling to agree on specific language US trade representative Robert light heads are denied reports there's been no progress on the force tech transfer policy has to be done properly and we made a lot of progress but were told you we were just didn't know what they're talking about China has long denied that it forces U. S. companies to transfer technology to their Chinese counterparts in the meeting trump also said he was inclined to extend his March first deadline to reach a deal he in Chinese president xi didn't king had agreed in December to a ninety day truce the two sides had been engaged in several waves of **** for tat terrorists affecting hundreds of billions of dollars worth of goods and roiling world markets without an extension of the truce US tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports are set to rise from ten to twenty five percent