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00:00:00
>>
UNKNOWN]
> Andrew Gillum is running for governor in Florida. You may not have heard of this young progressive Mayor of Tallahasee, yet Democratic mega donors and liberal leaders are betting he represents the party's future. Billionaire philanthropists George Sorps amd Tom Steyer have each committed about $1 million so far.
00:00:21
And he's got the endorsement of Bernie Sanders. So far he's struggling to gain traction with voters in the crowded democratic primary in his bid to become the state's first black governor. Reuters Letitia Stein followed him on a campaign trail.>> He was a really charismatic presence. He speaks engagingly about his personal life story.
00:00:41
He was the son of a bus driver and a construction worker who rose to become the mayor of Tallahassee. How his older brothers got in trouble with the criminal justice system, which gives him a guiding vision of why Florida needs to be place where people can get second chances.
00:00:57
Gillum told Reuters that is campaign can reach voters who are quote, blacker, browner, younger and poorer and often sit out midterm elections. And his call for Medicare for all and a record of fighting the national gun lobby also excite many white progressives. But he's currently the underdog in a field of far wealthier candidates.
00:01:17
Even with donors, like Tom Steyer, who think he could do good for the party, stayed wide.>> If Gillum is at the top of the ticket, with a historic bid to be Florida's first black governor, Steyer thinks that could help democrats in competative races up and down the ticket.
00:01:31
That includes several congressional contests in Florida, and a toss up Senate race. All of which could be critical to democratic efforts to regain control of congress.>> The primary is August 28.>> I do not believe that people who worked full time ought to be in poverty.