FIRST AIRED: November 27, 2018

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

×

Transcript

00:00:00
>> Voters Tuesday picking Mississippi's next senator, in a special election so contentious, President Trump last night returned to the state to once again boost the embattled Republican candidate. In back-to-back rallies in Tupelo and Biloxi, the President threw his weight behind Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith.>> Cindy is so important, so respected.
00:00:24
>> And went after her Democratic opponent, Mike Espy.>> How does he fit in with Mississippi?>> It's a race that's opened up old wounds from the state's dark past. Hyde-Smith came under fire this month for a comment that evoked Mississippi's history of lynching.
SOUND]>>
If he invited me to a public hanging, I'd be on the front row.
00:00:44
>>
LAUGH]>>
On Monday, a pair of nooses and hate signs were found hanging outside the Mississippi State Capitol. Espy on Tuesday, condemned her remarks.>> Her comments don't reflect the value of our state.>> Reports that Hyde-Smith attended an all white segregation academy in high school and pushed a revisionist view of the Civil War in the State Senate compounding the controversy.
00:01:08
Companies like Walmart, AT&T, and Google asking that their campaign donations to Hyde-Smith be returned. Despite that, Espy, a former agriculture secretary under President Clinton, is still the underdog. Reuters correspondent John Whitesides.>> It's a very Republican state that Trump won by 18 percentage points. I think that Espy has viewed the Doug Jones race in Alabama as a bit of a template.
00:01:35
They're both Deep South, reliably Republican states that Trump won big. And like Doug Jones in Alabama, Espy is trying to pull off what would be a huge upset in Mississippi, because a Democrat hasn't been elected to the Senate there since 1982.>> Jones was able to pull off a surprise victory against Republican Roy Moore in part because Moore was accused of sexual misconduct with several women when they were teenagers and he was in his thirties.
00:02:04
Tuesday's runoff in Mississippi was forced after neither candidate won a majority in the November 6th election, and is the final Senate race to be decided this year. Even if Espy does pull off an upset, Republicans will still have a majority in the Senate.