FIRST AIRED: September 18, 2018

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

We've got more news

Get our editor’s daily email summary of what’s going on in the world.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Replay Program
0:00
0:00
More Info

COMING UP:Share Opener Variant 1

×

Transcript

00:00:00
>> After days of relentless rain, Florence's fury is still not over.>> For many parts of North Carolina, the danger is still immediate. Catastrophic flooding and tornadoes are still claiming lives and property.>> In Leland, North Carolina, a low-lying city north of Wilmington, homes and businesses were engulfed by water that rose up to ten feet over Highway 17, in what local people called unprecedented flooding.
00:00:34
Reuters correspondent Ernie Scheyder is there.>> You can see just over my shoulder here a Jeep and a flooded out portion of a highway. So there's still major flooding concerns throughout the region. But Monday the sun came out, bringing a little bit of hope and relief to the millions of people throughout the region affected by the storm.
00:00:52
Meteorologists expect another day or two of intermittent rain as Florence's outer bands swing back through the region. That's bad news for the waterlogged area, which has been saturated by days and days of rain from hurricane Florence.>> The city of Wilmington found itself cut off from the rest of the state due to washed out roads and flooding.
00:01:12
But it's gotten some relief with the governor saying 23 truckloads of food and water made their way into Wilmington Monday morning. So far, more than 2,600 people and 300 animals have been rescued just in North Carolina.>> I know it might be a little scary, but we got you and we're gonna take care of you, okay.
00:01:33
>> And operations are ongoing. Going back to their home at a trailer park in Jacksonville, Michaela and Lisa Lloyd were shocked, their entire community submerged.>> It's sad cuz we've lived here for so long. It's sad that it's gone.>> Yeah, we got to start over.>> Florence has already set a state record for rain, surpassing the previous one set by Hurricane Floyd, which killed 56 people back in 1999.